How-To

4 arias & their common misconceptions

4 arias & their common misconceptions

Daughters have been making pouting faces and puppy eyes at their fathers to get what they want for centuries, and Puccini encapsulates the strategy perfectly. "Babbino" is like saying "Daddy", or even "Daddykins", and to sing it on top of the lush tune is the equivalent of crocodile tears. "I'll throw myself off a bridge", Lauretta paraphrases (twice), if she doesn't get her way. Ugh.

Jenna Simeonov
Shades of opera: how to tell your buffo from your bel canto

Shades of opera: how to tell your buffo from your bel canto

Verismo music is decidedly gorgeous, with long, sweeping lines and a thick orchestra. The musical style is a foundation for the film scores of today, and though the impression is powerful, the harmonic structure of many verismo scores is fairly simple; it adds to the audience accessibility, and makes for some beautiful tunes to hum as you leave the theatre.

Jenna Simeonov
Pianists: where's the fire?

Pianists: where's the fire?

It can be extremely humbling for a trained pianist to discover just how hard it is to stay with a conductor. It may seem unfair - shouldn't a conductor be a living, breathing version of a metronome, after all? In some cases, that's true; Philip Glass' music works well when a tempo is set and maintained, but we guarantee you wouldn't want to hear your Puccini at an unwavering 108 clicks a minute.

Jenna Simeonov
Tips for pianists: how to tremolo like a pro

Tips for pianists: how to tremolo like a pro

In a case like this, sometimes a slower tremolo yields better results on the piano. If you try for speed, it'll likely sound a bit drier, a bit more percussive; a slow tremolo lets you just sit in the sound that already exists, and your muscles will be relaxed enough to sustain it.

Jenna Simeonov
Aria guides: Dido's Lament

Aria guides: Dido's Lament

For our latest Aria Guide, we've picked an aria that has it all: it's beautiful, it's in English, and mezzos get to play Dido, an actual woman. In Purcell's Dido and Aeneas, "Dido's Lament" happens at the end of a simple and sad story: Aeneas, whom Dido loves and has agreed to marry, believes he has to leave her and go to Italy. As he goes, Dido dies from her grief.

Jenna Simeonov
Aria guides: O wie ängstlich, o wie feurig!

Aria guides: O wie ängstlich, o wie feurig!

Amid captured loved ones and Turkish harems, there's a tenor in love. Belmonte is off to resuce his abducted fiancée, Konstanze, but not without telling us how she makes his heart beat faster. For any tenor, this aria is a mountain of work; there's tricky coloratura, lines which hover through the passaggio, and making it to the end takes planning and stamina.

Jenna Simeonov
Aria guides: Ach, ich fühl's

Aria guides: Ach, ich fühl's

It's a deceptively simple aria, and the empty accompaniment, a singer can easily feel as though they're walking on eggshells. Along with help from your teachers and coaches, we can offer a few tips for keeping things simple, and creating the illusion of superhuman breath control.

Jenna Simeonov
Being a helpful pianist: a note on starting notes

Being a helpful pianist: a note on starting notes

It's hard to describe why (acoustic physicists, please feel free to chime in here), but sometimes a singular note, played on the piano, can be hard to understand. It's not that the singer can't hear it, but the note lacks context.

Jenna Simeonov
3 ways your English is showing

3 ways your English is showing

There are idioms in every language, and that's what we hear when someone speaks with a foreign accent. It's handy for singers to identify some of these habits and idioms that keep them from sounding comfortable in a non-native language. So, we've identified three big linguistic tells for North American English speakers, and how to keep them from foreign language mastery.

Jenna Simeonov
Aria guides: Va, laisse couler mes larmes

Aria guides: Va, laisse couler mes larmes

Shortly after the famous "Letter Scene" where she re-reads correspondence between her and Werther, Charlotte sings "Va! laisse couler mes larmes" to Sophie, her younger, more optimistic sister, telling her that it is sometimes a good thing to grieve, and not be consoled.

Jenna Simeonov

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